Feeding 9 Billion People and Creating a Healthier, More Resilient Agriculture.

That is the challenge taken up by the faculty, staff and students of the Department of Agronomy.  We generate and apply knowledge about plants that feed and benefit humankind.  We find and implement answers to problems and opportunities concerning efficiency and sustainability of crop production and in safe and environmentally-sound ways. We generate knowledge on the genetics, biochemistry and physiology of plants. We study the interactions among cropping systems, climate, and the environment. We work to ensure that agricultural systems and products in Wisconsin and the world are able to meet rapidly-changing needs and those of future generations.

  • Planting corn plots

Sudden Death Syndrome in Soybeans growing issue for WI farmers

Faculty member Shawn Conley discusses Soybean Sudden Death Syndrome with the Wisconsin Agriculturist: "Detection is the first thing," Conley recommends for farmers. "Don't assume it is [brown stem rot]. Know what pathogen is in the field." SDS is a new but increasing concern for Wisconsin farmers. It has similar characteristics to brown stem rot, a familiar enemy, but there is no genetic resistance to SDS. The WI Soybean Marketing Board has free testing kits available for soybean nematodes and SDS. Contact Shawn Conley for more information.
July 22, 2014
-20140722
uncategorized
10

Learn to Identify and Manage Invasive Species at WIFDN Field Day

WI First Detector Network Presents: Identifying, mapping, and managing invasive species in Wisconsin Field-day on August 1st. Invasive species are one of the top threats facing Wisconsin’s environment and economy. There are many ways for you to participate in helping to protect our natural heritage; one way is to get involved with Wisconsin’s First Detector Network (WIFDN). WIFDN is a network of volunteers that strive to assist in identification of invasive species. WIFDN is pleased to offer a FREE hands-on training in southeast Wisconsin on August 1st. Topics that will be discussed include emerald ash borer (EAB) and invasive plants. Join experts from UW Extension and Southeast Wisconsin Invasive Species Consortium (SEWISC) at Riveredge Nature Center (4458 County Road Y, Saukville, WI 53080) from 9:00-12:00. We will meet in the west parking lot approximately 1 mile southwest of the headquarters (between 4269 and 4277 Hawthorne Dr, Saukville, WI 53080). The first segment of the workshop will demonstrate how to identify trees afflicted with EAB and effectiveness of treatments to prevent injury to infected trees on your property. The second segment will focus on ...
July 16, 2014
-20140716
classes
10

Jean-Michel Ané named Rothermel-Bascom Professor in Agronomy

Agronomy professor Jean-Michel Ané was recently appointed the Rothermel-Bascom Professor in Agronomy.  The five-year professorship, bestowed by the UW-Madison Office of the Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, provides support for Ané’s research and scholarly activities.
July 8, 2014
-20140708
uncategorized
10

Joe Lauer named Fellow of CSSA

Congratulations to Joe Lauer, professor and Extension corn specialist in the Department of Agronomy, who has been selected as a Fellow of the Crop Science Society of America. Fellow is the highest recognition bestowed by the Crop Science Society of America. Members of the Society nominate worthy colleagues based on their professional achievements and meritorious service. Nominees will have made outstanding contributions in an area of specialization whether in research, teaching, extension, service, or administration and whether in public, commercial, or private service activities.
July 2, 2014
-20140702
uncategorized
10

Agronomy Society honors Shawn Conley

CALS agronomist Shawn Conley has been selected to receive the Agronomic Extension Education Award from the American Society of Agronomy. Conley, a UW-Extension soybean and small grains specialist, has authored or co-authored 45 refereed journal articles and has spoken to nearly 35,000 clients at more than 500 events. He recently co-authored a childrens’ book titled Coolbean the Soybean. ASA awards recognize outstanding contributions to agronomy through education, national and international service and research.
-20140702
uncategorized
10

Phenotypic and Transcriptional Analysis of Divergently Selected Maize Populations Reveals the Role of Developmental Timing in Seed Size Determination

Rajandeep S. Sekhon, Candice N. Hirsch, Kevin L. Childs, Matthew W. Breitzman, Paul Kell, Susan Duvick, Edgar P. Spalding, C. Robin Buell, Natalia de Leon, and Shawn M. Kaeppler Plant Physiol. 2014 165: 658-669. First Published on April 7, 2014; doi:10.1104/pp.114.235424   Seed size is a component of grain yield and an important trait in crop domestication. To understand the mechanisms governing seed size in maize (Zea mays), we examined transcriptional and developmental changes during seed development in populations divergently selected for large and small seed size from Krug, a yellow dent maize cultivar. After 30 cycles of selection, seeds of the large seed population (KLS30) have a 4.7-fold greater weight and a 2.6-fold larger size compared with the small seed population (KSS30). Patterns of seed weight accumulation from the time of pollination through 30 d of grain filling showed an earlier onset, slower rate, and earlier termination of grain filling in KSS30 relative to KLS30. This was further supported by transcriptome patterns in seeds from the populations and derived inbreds. Although the onset of key genes was earlier in small seeds, ...
June 10, 2014
-20140610
uncategorized
10