Feeding 9 Billion People and Create a Healthier, More Resilient Agriculture.

That is the challenge taken up by the faculty, staff and students of the Department of Agronomy.  We generate and apply knowledge about plants that feed and benefit humankind.  We find and implement answers to problems and opportunities concerning efficiency and sustainability of crop production and in safe and environmentally-sound ways. We generate knowledge on the genetics, biochemistry and physiology of plants. We study the interactions among cropping systems, climate, and the environment. We work to ensure that agricultural systems and products in Wisconsin and the world are able to meet rapidly-changing needs and those of future generations.

  • Planting corn plots

International Agriculture Colloquium

Unexpected Interactions: The Effects of Land and Economic Reforms on Chile's Agricultural Modernization, 1965 - 2000 Lovell (Tu) Jarvis Founding Director of the UC Davis Blum Center Thursday April 24, 6 - 7:00 PM Room 351 Moore Hall Lovell (Tu) Jarvis serves as Founding Director of the UC Davis Blum Center for Developing Economies. He is Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, University of California, Davis and Faculty Director of the UC Davis Chile-California Program. Dr. Jarvis’ research focuses on agricultural and environmental issues in developing countries.  
April 22, 2014
-20140422
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PhD Exit Seminar – Steven J. Damon

Epicuticular Waxes and Insect Resistance in Onion Steven J. Damon Wednesday April 23, 2014 11:00 Am Room 108 Plant Sciences
-20140422
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Journal Club – April 21st

Journal Club Will Meet on April 21st Room 475 Noon Next week's journal club will focus on organic agriculture - a topic that has been rather scarce in journal club lately!   Join Rachel Weil from the Agroecology department as she leads discussion about organic farming and environmental impact. One would assume that organic farming is better for the environment, in whichever way that is to be defined, but how, exactly? And hoe does it compare to conventional practices? The attached paper by Tuomisto et al. explores this, and uses a meta-analysis of European organic farming to determine its effects on the environment. When looking at output per area farmed, it was found that organic farms fare better when it comes to soil organic matter, nutrient losses, and greenhouse gas emissions, but when looked at in a different scale of measurement, the 'better' system might not be so clear cut.   We hope that you read over their interesting article and come prepared to discuss the place and the value of organic farming in your research, the larger agricultural context, and the future of food production. Tuomisto et al
April 16, 2014
-20140416
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University Lecture – Roger Blobaum

Building a Movement: Origins and Evolution of the Organic Farming Movement Roger Blobaum Formerly of Ceres Trust Founder, Organic University Board Member, MOSES Thursday, May 8, 2014 4 pm 1420 Microbial Sciences Building Sponsored by the Department of Horticulture and the Department of Agronomy
April 15, 2014
-20140415
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