Adam Gaspar recipient of 2016 Mott Scholarship

UW Agronomy PhD candidiate Adam Gaspar has been awarded the 2016 Gerald O. Mott Scholarship for Meritorious Graduate Students in Crop Science.

The Gerald O. Mott Scholarship is provided to a meritorious graduate student in crop science. The scholarship is supported by gifts from the Gerald O. Mott family to the Agronomic Science Foundation and administered by the Crop Science Society of America.

Adam will be presented with the award at the annual CSSA meeting in November.

2016 WI Agronomy Update Meetings

MADISON, Wis. — The Department of Agronomy will offer Crop Production and Management Meetings at eight locations during 2016. Joe Lauer, Dan Undersander and Shawn Conley will present the latest information on hybrid/variety performance, an analysis and discussion of last year’s growing season, and updated recommendations for field crop production.

The registration fee includes a meal and materials. Please pre-register with the Host Agent. A “walk-in” (Late) fee will be charged to those who have not preregistered. Additional information packets will be available for $18.00 each. Certified Crop Advisor CEU credits have been requested (3.0 hours in Crop Management). Below is a list of topics, meeting sites, dates and times. Please join us at meeting in your area.

Packet Materials

2015 Wisconsin Hybrid Corn Performance Trials – Grain and Silage (A3653)

2015 Wisconsin Soybean Variety Test Results (A3654)

2015 Perennial Forage Variety Update for Wisconsin (A1525)

Winter wheat varieties for grain in Wisconsin – 2015 (A3868)

Wisconsin Crop Improvement Association updates

Extension publications

Agronomy Advice articles

Discussion Topics

Forages

 

• Reduced lignin alfalfa management

• New race of anthracnose

• Coated grass seed

Corn

• A retrospective of WI corn production decisions

• RIB hybrid performance

• Do we need to do tillage for corn production in WI?

Soybeans and Small Grains

• Prioritizing Soybean Inputs to Maximize Grower Profitability in 2016

• Cover Crop or Fall Forage… Spring Grains Options Planted After Winter Wheat

agronomy-update-748x768

(Originally from Morning Ag Clips, here)

Agronomy News for 5/5/15

UW-Madison places 5th in the world for Agriculture and Forestry in the 2015 QS World University Rankings.

Alumnus Bryan Decker joins La Crosse Seed sales team.

Shawn Conley and Adam Gaspar discuss early spring soybean planting.

The 6th Annual Wisconsin Soybean Yield Contest has begun! The first place award in each division includes a $1,000 cash prize; second-place honors include a $500 prize. Winners will be selected for having the highest soybean yield based on bushels per acre at 13% moisture.

 

“Those numbers aren’t as big as they could be”: Climate Change affects Soybean Farmers Even In Good Years

MADISON, Wis. — Even during good years, our nation’s soybean farmers are, in essence, taking a loss. That’s because changes in weather patterns have been eating into their profits and taking quite a bite: $11 billion over the past 20 years.

This massive loss has been hidden, in effect, by the impressive annual growth seen in soybean yields thanks to other factors. But that growth could have been much greater—30% higher—if weather variations resulting from climate change had not occurred, says a study published last month in Nature Plants.

“We are still making yield gains because of breeding and other strategies, but those numbers aren’t as big as they could be,” says lead author Shawn Conley, a University of Wisconsin-Madison agronomy professor and UW-Extension soybean and wheat specialist.

In the study, researchers isolated the impacts of changing temperature and precipitation on soybean yields in a much more precise way than previously done. While earlier approaches relied on estimates, Conley’s team used data gathered from their own field trials, giving them access to reliable and consistent information about the genetics of the soybeans being grown, the management practices being used and the weather the fields saw throughout the growing season. Spyridon Mourtzinis, a post-doctoral fellow in Conley’s lab with expertise in statistics, took care of the number crunching.

“Spyridon removed the effects of the management strategies and genetic improvements, so that we could just focus our analysis on the impacts of weather variability,” says Conley.

Averaging the data across the U.S., the researchers found that soybean yields fell by around 2.4% for every one-degree rise in temperature. Considering the impacts of both temperature and precipitation together, they found quite a bit of variability among soybean-growing states, yet a trend emerged.

In Wisconsin and most other northern states, including South Dakota and Minnesota, the changes in climate factors actually led to higher soybean yields. Wisconsin, for instance, saw an increase of 17.5 kg/hectare/year over the 20 years studied. At the same time, most soybean-growing states further south, including Ohio, Arkansas and Kentucky, experienced decreases in yields.

These divergent responses have to do with historical norms. In colder northern states, soybeans seem to be enjoying the new warmer weather, whereas in states further south—where conditions had previously been fairly ideal—the additional heat is causing stress.

Because the states with the biggest yield losses are also our nation’s biggest soybean producers, the national impact comes out to a 30% yield loss overall, which amounts to an $11 billion economic loss, over the past 20 years.

Now that the impacts of weather variations are becoming clearer, the next step is to help growers minimize the negative impacts. Farmers have already been incorporating some strategies—earlier planting, no-till practices and growing later maturing soybeans—into their farming practices. The researchers’ goal is to further improve those strategies by producing region-specific suggestions that account for weather patterns at different times of the growing season.

Only then, says Conley, can the full potential of soybean yields be realized.

Original courtesy of Morning Ag Clips

Crop Production and Management Meetings – January 2015

The Department of Agronomy will offer Crop Production and Management Meetings at eight locations during January of 2015. Joe Lauer, Dan Undersander and Shawn Conley will present the latest information on hybrid/variety performance, an analysis and discussion of last year’s growing season, and updated recommendations for field crop production.

The registration fee includes a meal and materials. Please pre-register with the Host Agent. A “walk-in” fee will be charged to those who have not preregistered. Additional information packets will be available for $18.00 each.

Certified Crop Advisor CEU credits have been requested (3.0 hours in Crop Management). Below is a list of topics, meeting sites, dates and times. Please join us at meeting in your area.

Packet materials

*2014 Wisconsin Hybrid Corn Performance Trials – Grain and Silage (A3653)
*2014 Wisconsin Soybean Variety Test Results (A3654)
*2014 Perennial Forage Variety Update for Wisconsin (A1525)
*Winter wheat varieties for grain in Wisconsin – 2014 (A3868)
*Oat and Barley Variety Performance (A3874)
*NCSRP SCN Sampling Publication
*Extension publications
*Agronomy Advice articles
*Wisconsin Crop Improvement Association updates

Discussion Topics

Forages:
*Alfalfa stand changes stand over time.
*Performance of GM alfalfa varieties and potential for gene transfer to non GMO fields
*When to use alfalfa-grass mixtures

Corn:
*Corn Response to Seeding Rate: The Implications for Variable Rate Seeding
*Is the corn-soybean rotation sustainable? Evidence from long-term cropping system trials

Soybeans and Small Grains:
*WI Soybean and Winter Wheat Year in Review
*Multi-State High Yield Soybean Project Results: a First Look
*Should we consider in-furrow applications in soybean?

Locations, dates and times:

Janesville: Monday, Jan. 5 at noon

Monday, Jan. 5 at noon

Holiday Inn Express 3100 Wellington Dr

Nick Baker
Rock Co. Extension Office
51 S. Main St.
Janesville, WI 53545-3978
(608) 757-5696 nbaker2@uwex.edu

Madison:Tuesday, Jan. 6 at 7:30 am

Dane Co. Extension Office
1 Fen Oak Ct., Rm. 138
(SE Madison, Take Hwy 51 exit off Beltline, go N to E. Broadway and Agriculture Drive. Turn N)

Jennifer Blazek
Dane Co. Extension Office
5201 Fen Oak Drive., Rm. 138
Madison, WI 53718
(608) 224-3716 heidi.johnson@ces.uwex.edu

Fond du Lac, Tuesday, Jan. 6 at noon

Rm. 114 University Center

400 University Drive

Mike Rankin
Fond du Lac Co. Extension Office
400 University Drive
Fond du Lac, WI 54935-2998
(920) 929-3171 michael.rankin@ces.uwex.edu

Kimberly, Wednesday, Jan. 7 at 7:30 am

Liberty Hall
800 Eisenhower Drive
(Hwy. 441, College Avenue Exit, East 1 block)

Kevin Jarek
Outagamie County
3365 W Brewster St.
Appleton, WI 54914
(920) 832-5121 kevin.jarek@ces.uwex.edu

Wausau, Wednesday, Jan. 7 at noon

Luncheon at VFW Hall, 388 River Drive, then Meeting at Marathon County UWEX Office
212 River Drive

Dan Marzu
Marathon County UW-Extension Office
212 River Drive
Wausau, WI 54403
(715) 261-1230 daniel.marzu@ces.uwex.edu

Eau Claire, Thursday, Jan. 8 at 7:30 am

Clarion Hotel Campus Area/Green Mill Restaurant and Bar (Campus area)
2703 Craig Road

Mark Hagedorn
Eau Claire Co. Extension Office
227 1st Street West
Altoona, WI 54720-1601
(715) 839-4712 mark.hagedorn@ces.uwex.edu

Sparta, Thursday, Jan. 8 at noon

Jake’s Northwoods Hwy 21 (NE side of town) 1132 Angelo Rd.

Bill Halfman
Monroe County – UW Extension
14345 County Highway B, Room 1
Sparta, WI 54656-0309
(608) 269-8722 bill.halfman@ces.uwex.edu

Belmont, Friday, Jan. 9 at noon
Belmont Inn & Suites Convention Center/Banquet Hall

103 W Mound View Ave. (North of Hwy 151 at Belmont)

Ted Bay
Grant Co. Extension Office
916 E Elm St.
Lancaster, WI 53813-0031
(608) 723-2125 ted.bay@ces.uwex.edu
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Wisconsin Crop Management Conference
January 13-15, 2015, Alliant Energy Center, Madison

Midwest Forage Association Forage Production and Use Symposium
January 20-21, 2015, Chula Vista, Wisconsin Dells

Wisconsin Corn Growers Association, Wisconsin Soybean Association, CORN / SOY EXPO
January 29-30, 2015, Kalahari Resort, Wisconsin Dells

(As seen on Morning Ag Clips: https://www.morningagclips.com/wisconsin-agronomy-update-meetings/)

Wisconsin Soybean Grower Conferences to take place 12/2-12/4

MADISON, Wis. — A series of one-day Wisconsin Soybean Growers Conferences will prepare farmers for the 2015 season. In early December, growers, media and others interested in the state’s $59 billion agriculture economy will converge at regional soybean conferences held around the state. More than 75 farmers are expected to attend each of the conferences, where they will receive updates for next year’s growing season. Sponsored by the Wisconsin Soybean Marketing Board, these day-long events are scheduled for December 2 in Janesville, December 3 in Eau Claire and December 4 in Ripon.

Workshops at the series of Wisconsin Soybean Grower Conferences will cover a wide range of agricultural concerns and issues. At each location, the topics will include presentations on 2014 Soybean Diseases, Marketing Hints for 2015, and Irrigation, Soil and Water Management. Among the expert presenters is Dr. Shawn Conley, Soybean Extension Specialist at University of Wisconsin, Madison. He says, “Growers will learn what is new from a seed, crop protection and innoculants perspective, as well as managing inputs for 2015.”

Mike Cerny, president of the Wisconsin Soybean Marketing Board adds that the conferences offer soybean farmers a great opportunity. “Attendees will be able to obtain up-to-date information so they can make more informed decisions for the 2015 planting season,” Cerny says. The workshops also offer soybean farmers a chance to ask questions of the expert presenters.

Here are the conference dates and locations. Each event runs from 9 a.m. until 2:30 p.m.

• The Janesville Wisconsin Soybean Conference will be presented Tuesday, December 2, at the Holiday Inn, 3100 Wellington Place.

• The Eau Claire Wisconsin Soybean Conference takes place Wednesday, December 3, at the Sleep Inn Suites and Conference Center, 5872 33rd Avenue.

• The Ripon Wisconsin Soybean Conference convenes on Thursday, December 4, at Royal Ridges, 1 Westgate Drive.

For particulars about the conferences and more information about Wisconsin-grown soybeans, visit the Wisconsin Soybean Marketing Board website at www.wisoybean.org.

(As seen on MorningAgClips.com)

Gaspar, Smidt, Marburger featured in Corn and Soybean Digest

Graduate students Adam Gaspar, Ethan Smidt, and David Marburger are featured in the late November 2014 edition of The Corn and Soybean Digest, discussing their high-yield soybean research.

“You can’t approach 100 bushels without at least covering what they remove — 130 pounds of potassium per acre and 85 pounds of phosphorus per acre,” says Gaspar.

Marburger, Gaspar, and Smidt are graduate students with Shawn Conley.